Welcome to the Nishma Insight Discussion Forum blog.


The NISHMA INSIGHT is our popular dvar Torah, distributed almost every week by e-mail, that touches upon an important concept in the Parsha, theme in a holiday or event in contemporary society.

Often, readers respond, via e-mail, with comments that initiate a further dialogue. Through this Discussion Forum, we now wish to open this dialogue to others. If you have a comment on the INSIGHT, we invite you place to your comments here; then we invite everyone to join the discussion.

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Friday, March 28, 2014

Insight 5774-27: The Vilna Gaon's Statement

For Tazria
Not yet available on the Nishma website.

Study Question

1)

Friday, March 21, 2014

Insight 5774-26: MISTAKE, SIN, NEITHER: OR ALL?

For Shemini
Not yet available on the Nishma website.

Study Question

1)

Friday, March 14, 2014

Insight 5774-25: The Absence of Doubt

For Zachor
Not yet available on the Nishma website.


People may wonder: does this argument not also imply that we should have doubt in God? Are we not obligated to be certain in our conviction to Him and His Torah? 

Doubt is really a human condition and has nothing to do with the reality of God. One who doubts God really doubts oneself, one's ability to recognize the Divine. This is, however, in fact the human condition: we are all limited as human beings in knowing God. Surety is thus not a statement about God but, rather, a statement about self. One who is sure about what he believes about God or about what God says is really declaring a surety in his/her ability to comprehend God. Are we commanded to be as sure as we can possibly be in our relationship with the Divine? Absolutely. Are we, though, to think we are clearly 100% correct? There is the problem. As Rav Moshe says in his Hakdama to Iggrot Moshe, what is demanded of us is to do the best humanly possible for us. Could I still be wrong, though? The answer is yes. It is such a person who is then open to correction and education. Is it not surprising that Rav Moshe calls upon people to analyze his answers and tell him if there is a problem. This did not take away the needed adamancy he had in his psak for that is necessary of one called upon to render decisions. He also, though, recognized his inherent limitations. 

Belief in God cannot be belief in one's perception of God. Such a belief is actually the belief of the religious dogmatist who is not really interested in the true nature of God which fosters questioning but the certainty of his/her dogmatism. Our belief must be a belief in the true nature of God. This demands that one have some doubt in one's perception and is open to being taught about this True Nature which may demand a shift in one's perception.


Study Question

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Friday, March 7, 2014

Insight 5774-24: Individual Privacy

For Vayikra
Not yet available on the Nishma website.

Study Question

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